29th October 1918

Dear Emmie

Yours to hand of the 23rd inst received yesterday. I am glad to hear that the organ is finished, they have been a long time with it but I suppose they can’t get the labour. I hear from a chap back off leave that it is hard to get cigarettes in London even, so it does not matter about sending me any unless you have already bought some.

I am sorry to hear that the flu’ is so bad in London and hope that you all keep free of it. Mum sent me a cutting out of the paper of someone playing a piano in a big town out here: that was a nearer guess than yours in fact it was white hot. Thinking of peace has a bad effect on the troops and makes them “windy” or that is what official circulars state. I must say that K.T. is unlucky and she didn’t ought to have any more to do with her nice young man. You say “if he was my boy” well if ifs and ands etc.

We have seen more civilians lately who have been set free by us and they are thankful and can’t show their gratitude enough. I don’t think they have been too lightly handled by what they say especially some of the girls. It is evident that they have not been overfed and for the time being are sharing our rations until better arrangements can be made.

I have been practicing on a clarinette this last week and didn’t make a bad fist of it either. Well Emmie dear I must close now so as to write a letter home.

With Fondest Love

From Yours Always

Will xxx

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28th October 1918

Dear Emmie

I received a letter yesterday from you the first one for seven days. I have not got it to hand now so please excuse not answering questions. I did read that book “Rainbow Island” and did you know that two and a half chapters were missing: about 48 pages. It happened to read on fairly well so I presume you did not notice it. One section of the book was left out; a mistake in “making up”. We are having fairly warm weather for the time of year but perhaps it is usual here. We had a whist drive the other evening and it went off very well. I was not a prize winner of the 1st class, nor did I get the Booby prize. I will not write more now but will write a longer letter tomorrow (if I get the chance).

With Best Love

From Yours Ever

Will xxx

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26th October 1918

Dear Emmie

It is now five days since I have heard from you so I am just writing a few lines to let you know that I am still going strong. We have had a quiet time this last week although we (the drums) have had plenty of playing to do. We are supposed to have a canteen but they have [had] nothing to sell for some time so please send me some cigarettes as soon as poss.

We are still going forward fairly quickly but Johny is going back equally as fast. We are now in the 3rd army: I don’t know if I told you before. Mabel will be 21 tomorrow I sent her a letter the other day wishing her “many happy returns” and I dare say she has had it by now. By the time you receive this I will have been out here seven months. It does seem a long time and I am longing to see you but I suppose it will be about another three months before I start thinking of leave unless they send more a month than they are sending now.

I saw some civilians today as we passed through some captured villages and they are all round the troops. As we passed through one place we struck up a French march and one lady burst into tears and went indoors. About a fortnight ago I think I told you we were in private-houses; well we went straight from there into a stable and it was the worst place I have ever been in but we soon cleared it out and made it inhabitable. Well my dear I must close now but will write again as soon as poss.

With Fondest Love

From Yours Ever

Will xxx

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